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Coaches' Corner

Drills

Running back drills

Not only do running backs need to be fast to gain yardage, but they also have to be agile to dodge incoming defenders. Successful running backs have a strong sense of intuition and great vision of the field. This section outlines running back drills that help you develop fundamental skills and build quick feet, so you can map out your routes and stay—quite literally—two steps ahead of your opponents.

See running back drills to add to your football training.

Quarterback drills

Time and time again, quarterbacks have made huge impacts on the game of football. But becoming a standout quarterback takes more than a great arm—you need to be strategic, quick, and consistent. These quarterback drills break down key fundamentals, such as how to properly receive, grip and release the ball.

View quarterback drills that improve technique and footwork.

Wide receiver drills

Flag football is a high-speed game where the clock rarely stops and players are always on the move—especially wide receivers. We’ve compiled a list of 15 wide receiver routes that every receiver should know, ranging from basic routes in the route tree to more complicated routes that require advanced footwork and directional changes. Whether you’re going for a quick first down or a Hail Mary, these wide receiver drills have got you covered.

See 15 wide receiver routes to add to your playbook.

Football agility drills

You can’t underestimate the importance of agility when it comes to playing flag football. Offensive players need to navigate sharp routes and tight pivots with ease, while effective defensive players need swift movements to efficiently pull the ball-carrier’s flags. This section details five football drills that focus on quick footwork, speed and smooth transitional movements to make you a more agile flag football player.

Check out 5 flag football drills that focus on improving agility.

Football conditioning drills

Conditioning is essential in every sport, especially flag football. It’s important that players properly warm up their muscles and build endurance so they’re prepared for practice or the game ahead. Plus, conditioning is one of the best ways to improve strength and flexibility in muscles that don’t always get the attention they need. That said, these football drills tend to be—well—a bit tedious. That’s why we’ve selected youth flag football drills that are engaging and fun, so you hardly notice how hard you’re working.

Take a look at six conditioning drills you can include in your football training.

Flag pulling drills

Flag football is a non-contact sport. Instead of physically tackling, players wear flags that hang along their sides by a belt and the defensive line must successfully remove the flag from the ball-carrier’s belt to end the play. This section outlines exactly how—and where—to pull the flag, so you can become a skilled defensive player. After all, good defense is just as important as good offense.

See football drills to help you practice properly pulling a flag.

How to catch a football

One fundamental skill youth flag football players need to learn right from the get-go is how to properly catch a football. The way you align your body, position your hands, and tuck the ball can help you consistently catch the ball and protect it from defenders. This section walks through techniques that you can easily incorporate into your football training schedule.

Learn how to catch a football with these football drills.

How to throw a football

There’s a lot that goes into throwing a football—hand placement, grip, motion, release point. This section provides a step-by-step guide on how to accurately throw the football and walks through basic football drills you can do to nail down these techniques. We even cover how to throw the ball farther and give it a perfect spiral.

Add these football drills to your workout and throw the ball accurately each time.

How to snap a football

Every play starts with a snap between the center and quarterback. In flag football, the center has two options after the snap: they can play as a shield, warding off defenders using lateral movements. Or the center can release and become a receiver, opening themselves up for a pass. So, not only do you need to learn the different snapping methods, but you also need to make these movements seamless so you can quickly take off on your route afterward. These football drills provide a variety of snapping stances and techniques, so you can find a perfect rhythm with your quarterback.

Learn how to snap a football with these flag football drills.

 

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